4
$\begingroup$

I'm interested in getting an overview of the leading approaches to quantum computing from a physics perspective. I've read most of Nielsen and Chuang, but its chapter on physical realizations looks extremely out of date.

Is there a resource at a similar level that covers the approaches used by, e.g. Google, Microsoft, Pan's group, and IBM? I've seen a lot of qualitative material, but it's usually aimed at computer science people and thus physics-free. I'm looking for something at the level of "here's the Hamiltonian describing a single qubit, here's the interaction Hamiltonian describing a gate, here's how readout is done", and so on.

$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

If you are interesting in superconducting qubit architecture then these might be helpful:

Superconducting Qubits:Current State of Play

A Quantum Engineer’s Guide to Superconducting Qubits

The other things you can do is probably follow people in the field that working on these technologies and read their publications. For example, you can follow John Martinis's group and go over their publications, presentations, etc. The other things that might be very helpful is to go through his students PhD dissertations which is where you probably find the most details work.

For trapped-ion system, you can follow Chris Monroe's group. Again, he put up all of his past student's dissertations on his website so you can go through them as well.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Regarding John Martinis' group: these links are still useful (especially PhD dissertations), but for most up-to-date information, I'd also include the link to the new website: quantumai.google. $\endgroup$ Jan 23 at 21:14
1
$\begingroup$

Yes I would highly recommend Appendix B, C and D of this book written by the National Academy of Sciences: https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25196/quantum-computing-progress-and-prospects (you can click on Download Free PDF for an electronic copy). Even though it is about 3 years old, I don't believe there have been huge advancements in terms of the fundamentals since then. I actually would recommend reading the whole thing :)

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.