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When using a simulator, it doesn't really matter what kind of qubit you refer to. You can even mix-and-match the types. The type of qubit only becomes relevant when you intend to run on a device, because devices have qubits at specific locations. For example, if you wanted to run on Bristlecone, you would limit yourself to GridQubit instances that actually ...


4

1) Magic state distillation is performed within the surface code If you mean the distillation circuit is implemented with encoded logical qubits instead of raw physical qubits, then yes. 2) The initial step of producing many copies of raw noisy T-states is done through the direct use of a non-fault tolerant T-gate Yes, the initial T states fed into the ...


3

is the common depiction of a surface code (the pattern of the measure qubits and data qubits) to be taken literally as a real-space image of the actual hardware? Correct. The surface code is physically implemented by a planar grid of qubits. Left image source are surface codes still a theoretical framework due to the massive amount of qubits that are ...


2

1) There are 4 Bell states, namely the ones you listed divided by $\sqrt{2}$. There is no "the bell state". The Bell states are only defined for 2 qubits, so there is no "higher dimensional definition of a Bell state". One of the key features of the Bell states is that they're maximally entangled. If this is what you'd like in a higher dimensional analog of ...


2

To make a simple example, let's imagine we are not doing measurement by instead just applying the stabilizer operators. So we want to do $XXXX$ around the $X$ plaquettes, and $ZZZZ$ around the $Z$ plaquettes. The method in the article you mention applies operations in four steps: first to the 'north east' qubit of each plaquette, then in the order NW $\to$ ...


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