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It is not very easy to explain how a quantum computer works. Your question is very broad. It can take even whole book to explain everything you want to know clearly, so this forum is probably not the best place to do so. I would recommend reading this book: Hidden In Plain Sight 10: How To Program A Quantum Computer. I am self learner in quantum computing ...


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[Can't comment and so, writing an answer] As @Sanchayan aptly pointed the theoretical/mathematical arguments which could indicate that superposition is not just an assumption. A couple more thoughts: You're right in observing that the superposition collapses to 0 or 1 when observed and that's expected due to the collapse of the wave function. A quick ...


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Whether or not quantum superposition is a "truth", is a philosophical question. Quantum theory is simply an axiomatic mathematical model of the universe that happens to give correct experimental predictions (at least, for a fairly broad range) for several physical phenomena. It certainly might be possible to come up with a different mathematical model of the ...


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'Quantum parallelism' is a common misconception - sure, the quantum computer does compute in a 'parallel' fashion, but really the power of quantum computing emerges from constructive / destructive interference. If you wanted, you could absolutely make a quantum computer behave in a classical format: constantly measure the qubits and correct if necessary. ...


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Classical computers are inherently deterministic, so they either generate pseudorandom numbers, or use an external physical process with statistically random noise to generate random numbers. Quantum computers are inherently probabilistic, so generating true random numbers is very natural for them. Quantum random number generators are already on the market ...


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