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"Is Quantum Biocomputing ahead of us?" There has been some work done on biocomputing, quantum computing, spin chemistry, and magnetochemical reactions. Correlated radical pairs — pairs of transient radicals created simultaneously, such that the 2 electron spins, one on each radical, are correlated — on photoactive magnetoreceptive proteins such as ...


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The naming started in NMR and it has become the difference between the following two experiments. Experiment one: Prepare the qubit in a superposition state (apply a H gate) and vary the wait time and then measure in the superposition basis (apply another H gate). The decay time of this experiment is $T_2^*$. We commonly call this a Ramsey experiment. ...


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I have worked with NVs in nanodiamonds a little bit, and you are totally right, surface characteristics have a huge influence on how far we can push them. There are definitely multiple groups working on the chemistry/material science that are working to clean up the surfaces as much as possible. I had a colleague, Carlo Bradac who worked with our chemistry ...


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Given a quantum system in a state defined by a density matrix $\rho$, it is an accepted terminology to use the term population for the diagonal matrix elements (not necessarily in the computational basis). Since a normalized vector corresponds to a pure state, thus we can define a population of the pure state $\psi$ by: $$P_{\psi} = \langle \psi | \rho | \...


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There has been a great deal of scientific debate over evidence of quantum effects in biology due to the difficulties of reproducing scientific evidence. Some have found evidence of quantum coherence while others have argued this is not the case. (Ball, 2018). The most recent research study (in Nature Chemistry, May 2018) found evidence of a specific ...


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Much has been written about Quantum Biology. A somewhat old -and yet, solid- take is that of Phillip Ball, The dawn of Quantum Biology (Nature 2011, 474, 271-274). For now, let's not review that and instead focus on your questions. On the first question:(is it solving our problems?) A system (or process) described by Quantum Biology is non-trivially ...


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Articles on technology from 10 years ago are often outdated, to some extent the same can be said of last year's information. Occasionally something will stand for decades, or fall into decline only to be revisited later. The most optimistic perspective is: someone is working on it. Here are some more recent articles on room temperature QC: "Room-...


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I don't know the translation into physics, but the circuit you want for the most basic demonstration is the following: Here, $|+\rangle=(|0\rangle+|1\rangle)/\sqrt{2}$, and the gates are controlled-not gates and controlled-phase gates. The state $|\psi\rangle$ can be any input state initially. The first time the circuit is run prepares the $|\psi\rangle$ ...


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From Chapter 15 of NII's quantum information lecture series on "Fundamentals of Noise processes" (link here): An applied DC field $H_0$ is not completely uniform in all space points. If many spin qubits are placed in such an inhomogeneous DC field, they have different Larmor frequencies. This leads to the dephasing effect if we compare the phase ...


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The best I have it's this generic answer, which I put here for clarity, hoping for improvements/corrections or even to be superseded by something better: If the limiting factor for fidelity in a given architecture+algorithm are the single-qubit gates, or the two-qubit gates, or the measurement, and if this limiting factor is not optimized in a ZEFOZ point,...


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I think your reference has the answer: nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond, where you can do one qubit gates at room temperature. In fact, even higher temperatures are possible, but you will have to play a tradeoff between fidelity and temperature at some point. That said, NV centers are not scalable, and I don't think more than 2 qubits will ever be ...


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Let me go for a self-learner experience. After some reading, my short answer to my own question Would the calculation of the loss of entanglement be necessarily related to delocalized vibrational modes that simultaneously involve the local environment of both triplets? is: probably yes, but not necessarily/primarily. A longer answer follows. With a ...


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