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If you take as definition "the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years", it definitely does not apply: as answered here in Do the 'fundamental circuit elements' have a correspondence in quantum technologies? there exist no transistors-as-fundamental-components (nor do exist fundamental-parallel-to-transistors) in a ...


8

tl;dr- Moore's law won't necessarily apply to the quantum computing industry. A deciding factor may be if the manufacturing processes can be iteratively improved to exponentially increase something analogous to transistor count or roughly proportional to performance. Background: Moore's law and why it worked It's important to note that Moore's law was ...


7

Ion trap quantum computers hold ions in empty space using electric not magnetic fields. That is impossible using static fields (Earnshaw's theorem) so an alternating field is used. The effect is that charged particles such as ions seek a field minimum; this type of ion trap is also called a quadrupole trap because the simplest (lowest order) field having a ...


7

You may want to check out this Schaetz et al, Reports on Progress in Physics of 2012 "Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions" (alternate link in semanticscholar). In sum: yes, the arrangement of the ions is one key limitation to scalability, but no, configurations are not currently limited to a single line of atoms. On that ...


6

The first thing to understand about Moore’s law is that it is not a law in the absolute sense, mathematically provable, or even postulated (like a law of physics). Really, it was just a rule of thumb that said the number of transistors in a processor would double every x years. This can be seen in the way that the value x has changed over time. Originally, ...


6

While I’m not an experimentalist, and have not studied these systems in any great depth, my (crude) understanding is the following: In ion traps you (more or less) have to trap the ions in lines. However, this isn’t a limitation in terms of the ease of communication because what you’re probably thinking about is when a linear system has nearest neighbour ...


5

Some near-term quantum algorithms rely on getting lucky with the measurements, and in fact these algorithms will not scale efficiently to large sizes. But most quantum algorithms don't have this problem; it is required that the amount luck needed [i.e. retries] scales only polynomially with the problem size. For example, Shor's algorithm fails if the ...


4

Plain and simple. Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing, or is it similar but with the numbers adjusted (ex. triples every 2 years). Also, if Moore's law doesn't apply, why do qubits change it? A great question, with great answers; still, I will try my hand at it. No, most quantum computers do not have qubits created in silicon; even the few that do ...


3

This article seems to adequately explain what you are asking. It shows the growth of usable qubits in quantum computers. So the question comes up whether Moore’s Law can also be applied to quantum qubits. And early evidence suggests that indeed it may [...] The adiabatic line would be a prediction for quantum annealing machines like the D-Wave ...


2

No, as point 4 is not satisfied. The D-Wave machines are quantum annealers and thus not universal. See this question on how to make from the D-Wave machine a universal quantum computer.


1

Moore's law is not a fundamental law of the nature. It is just a heuristic mentioned by Moore to show the growing importance of computer technology. You should never take it granted and there is nothing wrong if the actual trend doesn't follow Moore's law. Secondly, Quantum computers give speed up in only certain kinds of computations. You cannot expect it ...


1

The quantum equivalent of Moore's Law is Rose's Law which states that "the number of qubits in a scalable quantum computing architecture should double every year." The prediction was made by Geordie Rose of D-Wave circa 2003. See D-Wave's Future of Hardware, this article or this amazing answer for more info. My understanding is that a quantum computer can ...


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