25 votes
Accepted

Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing?

If you take as definition "the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years", it definitely does not apply: as answered here in Do the 'fundamental circuit ...
agaitaarino's user avatar
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8 votes

Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing?

tl;dr- Moore's law won't necessarily apply to the quantum computing industry. A deciding factor may be if the manufacturing processes can be iteratively improved to exponentially increase something ...
Nat's user avatar
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8 votes

Scalability of ion trap quantum computers

You may want to check out this Schaetz et al, Reports on Progress in Physics of 2012 "Experimental quantum simulations of many-body physics with trapped ions" (alternate link in semanticscholar). In ...
agaitaarino's user avatar
  • 3,807
6 votes

Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing?

The first thing to understand about Moore’s law is that it is not a law in the absolute sense, mathematically provable, or even postulated (like a law of physics). Really, it was just a rule of thumb ...
DaftWullie's user avatar
6 votes

Scalability of ion trap quantum computers

While I’m not an experimentalist, and have not studied these systems in any great depth, my (crude) understanding is the following: In ion traps you (more or less) have to trap the ions in lines. ...
DaftWullie's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How to limit the error probability in large scale quantum computers

It is true that fidelity decays exponentially in the course of quantum computation. This is indeed a major limitation of NISQ computers that imposes a stringent "depth budget". In order to ...
Adam Zalcman's user avatar
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6 votes

Why don't quantum computing scientists build two 50-qubit processors and connect them in parallel instead of building one 100-qubit processor?

This reminds me of the Q20:20 engine that NQIT aimed to build over a 5-year period from January 2015 to January 2020, for which they received £38,000,000 of funding. The goal was to build a 400-...
user1271772's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

How scalable are quantum computers when measurement operations are considered?

Some near-term quantum algorithms rely on getting lucky with the measurements, and in fact these algorithms will not scale efficiently to large sizes. But most quantum algorithms don't have this ...
Craig Gidney's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Why do current large-scale QCs fail to run Shor's algorithm?

Yes, there's a big difference between physical and logical qubits. The (physical) qubits that make up a device such as the IBM one suffer from noise. Basically, errors that mean the operations you're ...
DaftWullie's user avatar
4 votes

Fault-tolerant code and the error rate

There is no contradiction. The threshold theorem requires that the error rate, i.e. error probability per gate (or per unit of time), be below a threshold. On the other hand, the exponential decay ...
Adam Zalcman's user avatar
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4 votes

Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing?

Plain and simple. Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing, or is it similar but with the numbers adjusted (ex. triples every 2 years). Also, if Moore's law doesn't apply, why do qubits change it? ...
Rob's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Will Moore's Law be no longer effective once quantum computers are created?

but aren't quantum computers much more powerful than just double-powered classical computers? Yes. A universal quantum computer with only 100 qubits (12.5 quantum bytes) can find the ground state ...
user1271772's user avatar
  • 13.6k
3 votes

Does Moore's law apply to quantum computing?

This article seems to adequately explain what you are asking. It shows the growth of usable qubits in quantum computers. So the question comes up whether Moore’s Law can also be applied to quantum ...
Dustin K's user avatar
3 votes

Why don't quantum computing scientists build two 50-qubit processors and connect them in parallel instead of building one 100-qubit processor?

Qubits need to be able to share entanglement in order to run quantum algorithms. Qubits without entanglement are essentially classical bits. You can't just have two 50 qubit processors and treat them ...
CasualScience's user avatar
2 votes

types of states that can be created with a given number of entangling gates

The question seems to ask for: A quantum state that requires $O(n^2)$ entangling gates to prepare, starting from some canonical state (say the all-0's ket) Wherein the state so-prepared is "of ...
Mark Spinelli's user avatar
2 votes

Why don't quantum computing scientists build two 50-qubit processors and connect them in parallel instead of building one 100-qubit processor?

How do you connect your two processors and with high fidelity let them communicate? As I'm sure you can imagine, it's probably fairly easy to do over classical channels, however to pass quantum ...
user245427's user avatar
2 votes

Does the D-Wave 2000Q satisfy DiVincenzo's criteria?

No, as point 4 is not satisfied. The D-Wave machines are quantum annealers and thus not universal. See this question on how to make from the D-Wave machine a universal quantum computer.
nippon's user avatar
  • 1,497
1 vote

Will Moore's Law be no longer effective once quantum computers are created?

Moore's law is not a fundamental law of the nature. It is just a heuristic mentioned by Moore to show the growing importance of computer technology. You should never take it for granted and there is ...
Trect's user avatar
  • 119
1 vote

Will Moore's Law be no longer effective once quantum computers are created?

The quantum equivalent of Moore's Law is Rose's Law which states that "the number of qubits in a scalable quantum computing architecture should double every year." The prediction was made by Geordie ...
user820789's user avatar
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