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In all honesty, I think quantum computing is a really, really bad place to start if your interested in computers. It's much more like being a "mathematician" where you're locked alone in a basement and have to write papers on math that MIGHT be useful some day 200 years from now. Learn to program on a classical computer first. And if you're interested in ...


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I believe you're thinking of the all-versus-nothing proofs based on GHZ states. You start with a state such as $$ |\Psi\rangle=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(|000\rangle+|111\rangle) $$ and you select at random one of the four measurements to implement: $X\otimes X\otimes X$, $X\otimes Y\otimes Y$, $Y\otimes X\otimes Y$ or $Y\otimes Y\otimes X$. Assuming every one of ...


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Are there scenarios in which Bell nonlocality can be observed without such averages, that is, in a single-shot scenario? No, you have to collect statistics. Any single result you see could have been due to classical players picking completely at random and getting lucky. Making the chance of classical luck arbitrarily close to zero requires repetition (or ...


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Have you tried the Bloch Sphere Playground Application? It just might be what you are looking for. Bloch Sphere Playground Application https://javafxpert.github.io/grok-bloch/


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Original paper: Going beyond Bell's theorem Papers by Mermin: Quantum mysteries revisited Hidden variables and the two theorems of John Bell We can give a non-probabilistic proof that local hidden variables theories are incompatible with Quantum Mechanics. The proof does not explain how experimentally decide which theory is correct; it just shows more ...


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I would recommend getting started by looking at the Qiskit website. There is a textbook which starts from the beginning to get you up to speed with quantum computing and programming quantum computers. There are also tutorials and videos to help with learning Qiskit. Additionally, there are many online courses, but some may require a high level on linear ...


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In this paper, the authors used Knot theory to define what they call 'Path Model Representation'. In a later section they convert this representation to qubits by switching to binary.


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