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1

I just found this: https://brilliant.org/courses/quantum-computing/, I just did the intro but the remaining is very promising. In the end of the description: Our focus is learning how to exploit the laws of quantum mechanics in order to compute. By the end, you'll know your way around the world of quantum information, have experimented with the ins ...


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I just found this now: https://brilliant.org/courses/quantum-computing/, I will start it today, at this moment I don't know how far I will go with the free subscription since I joined it following the link in the Microsoft Quantum blog post (where you can have more info about the content) . For late joiners and non campaign users only 2 chapters will be ...


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I am also an undergraduate hoping to start a career in quantum computing someday. I'm a physics student who became interested in the subject about a year ago, and these are some things that helped me build a foundation. In terms of background, linear algebra is the only course that is essential for understanding the basics of the subject. The reason is ...


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Understanding the basic theory of quantum computing should be within reach. If you understand linear algebra, then math will not be your stumbling block. Quantum mechanics shouldn't be either — while you do need to exploit some of its machinery, you do not need a deep understanding to get started. Most introductory QC resources will build up the essential ...


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I would also recommend looking up Jack Hidary's new book "Quantum Computing: An Applied Approach" which provides a very hands-on approach for learning the basics (and more).


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I think it would be best if you start reading Mike and Ike. Buy the hard copy. Go through the exercises. This would be sufficient to read the papers. The further reading section would provide starting points from where it would be suitable to enter the literature. For the programming aspects best place to start is Qutip


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Yes. We need to have an aptitude for the subject to learn. Seems, you have a keen desire to learn quantum physics based computing. The future of the computing technology is quantum, the digital computing will be a past and will be known as dumb technology of 0's and 1's very soon. Your interest for quantum computing is more than enough to go deep into ...


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I am working on a textbook that is currently in Early Access called Learn Quantum Computing with Python and Q#. It is intended for folks who want to learn how to program for a quantum computer, and learn the basics of how a quantum computer works along the way. Only knowledge prerequisites are programming in some language (Python helps but not really ...


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I would definitely say go for it. I have a lot less experience and math knowledge than you do, but I have been able to learn the basics. There is certainly some stuff that goes over my head, but I think you would be well prepared. The one area where you may need more study is logic and classical computer science. Having knowledge, even somewhat basic ...


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The more you know about math, programming, quantum physics, etc. the better, but this field is new for everyone involved. We are all constantly learning so I guess you should do OK. Having said that, I would recommend you to develop your programming skills (Python is widely used in this realm) and start reading the stuff provided online by companies that are ...


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