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Microsoft has invested huge resources into engineering topological qubits. Their approach is based on topological Majorana states, which occur at the edges of a topological superconducting chain or at interfaces between such chains. For those who see these words for the first time, a quick mental representation is supplied by a ribbon, which can be twisted a ...


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Here is a handful of Linear Optical Quantum Computation (LOQC) resources I have found useful in the past: "Linear Optical Quantum Computing" (2005) by Kok et. al.: this is probably the best review paper that came out after Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn's 2001 discovery that theoretically-efficient LOQC was possible. It's a pretty thorough but very accessible ...


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a good stater i would say is the paper of Knill and Laflamme about LOQC (Linear Optical Quantum computing) from 2001, that says that quantum computing can be achieved with linear optic. Photons are really good as they can be used in many way to create qubits (polarisation of course, but also time, frequency, OAM). A Ph.D Thesis of Laurent Olislager is ...


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With magnetic resonance based quantum computing, the amplitude(integrated area) and relative phase of the read-out spectra tells you the state of the qubits. In this particular example, two different carbon qubits are read out simultaneously, while the third qubit, a hydrogen, would need a separate experiment to read out. The spectrum consists of two ...


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