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Moore's law deals with the number of transistors in an integrated circuit, which is used as a proxy for computational power. In a quantum computing device the analogy would be the number of qubits. However, this by itself would be a poor benchmark, namely because it is easy to build lots of qubits. Building many qubits with properties such as long ...


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According to so-called threshold theorem, it is possible to get rid of errors in quantum computation with arbitrary precision. However, there is an assumption that you have enough qubits. To ilustrate the idea, you can encode one qubit $|q\rangle=\alpha|0\rangle+\beta|1\rangle$ with more qubits, for example $|q\rangle=\alpha|0000\rangle+\beta|1111\rangle$ ...


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Small ion trap quantum computers have all-to-all connectivity. Two-qubit gates can be executed between any arbitrary pair of ions in the trap. This has been demonstrated on up to 11 qubits (see, for example, https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-13534-2). But it becomes difficult to maintain this control when the number of ions gets too large. A linear ...


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