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I recommend checking out this reference if you haven't already, specifically page 28. Basically, starting from the classical Hamiltonian of the circuit described in figure 12, we see that the classical external voltage drive $V_d(t)$ ends up scaling the circuit charge variable $Q$, which, when quantized, can be expressed as the operator $Q \rightarrow \hat{...


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It is possible, and there are already existing simulators. For example, Microsoft released Q# back in 2017 in order to work on quantum algorithm, it came with a simulator as well, built on top of classical .NET: In order to invoke the quantum simulator, another .NET programming language, usually C#, is used, which provides the (classical) input data for the ...


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First of all, yes, we can simulate qubits. It is proven, that quantum Turing machine is equivalent to the classical one, so anything that can be computed on the quantum system, can be computed on the classical one (and vise versa). However, there are some problems: To represent $n$ qubits you need a vector with $2^n$ complex numbers, so this vectors quickly ...


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Program for measuring in x direction with GHZ states. Try changing the value of max_dim and see the run time. clear all; clc; max_dim = 11; for dim = 1:max_dim % GHZ state rho = zeros(2^dim, 2^dim); rho(1,1) = 0.5; rho(1,2^dim)= 0.5; rho(2^dim, 1) = 0.5; rho(2^dim, 2^dim) = 0.5; up = 1/sqrt(2)*[1;1]; down = 1/sqrt(2)*[1;-1]; P = zeros(2^dim,1)...


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Basically, the current and voltage oscillate - they have uncertain values that would correspond to oscillation in the classical limit. In the ground state, the uncertainty is at or near the minimum allowed by the uncertainty principle. In the first excited state, the uncertainty is greater. That is, if you were to perform a measurement you would get a larger ...


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