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3

Much as in CMOS we almost always equate a low voltage with binary zero, and high voltage with binary one, and a classical $\mathsf{AND}$ gate as implementing the truth-table by adjusting voltages to be consistent, we have similar requirements in quantum computing to call $\vert 0\rangle$, $\vert 1\rangle$, and the Hadamard gate acting on it in the manner you ...


1

Quantum computers are susceptible to these errors/noise because of physical disturbances. An example of this is if some molecule in the surrounding air were to bump or approach the qubit it would transfer some kinetic energy and maybe affect the state. Another example is if a qubit interferes with any adjacent qubit, if they "bump" into one another their ...


2

My guess is that this is an example of co-opetition, i.e. collaborative competition. Number of qubits is just a single characteristic of a quantum processor, but there are a lot more, like tolerance, topology, etc. Also this characteristic is the only one that most people understand. Thus it's not reasonable to put all the resources on the increasing just ...


10

It's just a coincidence. I can speak from personal recollection on the Google side. Google originally intended to use a 72 qubit chip (Bristlecone) where qubits were essentially directly connected to each other. They then switched to an architecture where qubits were connected indirectly via a coupler. The coupler requires a control line, so this increased ...


1

I'm sure that this has something to do with quantum decoherence or "noise" which is caused when more qubits are added. It's likely that they are both at the frontlines of research so 53 qubits are the best that they can do given the hardware that they have access to. As they add more qubits it gets tougher to compute and prompts them to find some suitable ...


4

In general, "operating on a state with an observable" does not have direct physical meaning (i.e. you cannot think of it as evolving the state doing something to it). What does have physical meaning, is applying a unitary operation to a state. Every unitary operator corresponds to a physical operation that you can (in principle) implement, transforming (...


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