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Let me first answer the general question how to get a reasonably tight Lieb-Robinson (LR) speed when you are facing a generic locally interacting lattice model, and then I'll come back to the 1D XY model in your question, which is very special to be exactly solvable. General Method The method to obtain the tightest bound to date (for a generic short-range ...


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do we need to come up with completely different quantum-based solutions for such problems, or is there a way to 'interpret' existing algorithms to the quantum domain and still expect some speedup? Generally speaking yes, you need to come up with different algorithms. You cannot simply take a classical algorithm and "quantize it" in a straightforward way. ...


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The reason that a quantum computer is faster in same tasks is given by different computational paradigm based on quantum mechanics laws. They mainly exploit superposition (i.e. state of qubit is linear combination of zero state and one state) and quantum entanglement (i.e. two or more qubits are connected and they behave as one system, or in other words ...


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Quantum computers are not just the "conventional computer killer" or a speedy replacement for the conventional computers as you might have assumed in your question. Firstly, some classical tasks that are well suited to quantum computers. They run them really well in a much lesser time. This is because they are able to crunch large numbers using a small ...


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