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I'm probably late to party but I found this section today. In terms to answer your question[s] I made a lot of thoughts and read enough paper for a tree. I found 2 excellent experiments (very timely) that show their practical testing problems and solutions. And most important their preparation for a reproducible quantum state. The documentations of both ...


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To build a noise model from scratch and compare with the backend noise model, you can do from qiskit import * from qiskit.providers.aer.noise import NoiseModel from qiskit.providers.aer.noise.device.models import (basic_device_readout_errors, basic_device_gate_errors) IBMQ.load_account() provider = IBMQ....


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I know that noise is a big challenge for running this protocol because it is hard to understand whether the error is produced by noise or eavesdropper. To make the success rate higher you assume that the noise is also caused due to eavesdropping. As you know this protocol heavily relies on probability calculations. So, while calculating the probability for ...


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The standard noisy approach is not to try to determine the presence of an eavesdropper as such, but to create a final key where, even if there is an eavesdropper, you can still be confident that the eavesdropper has negligible information about the key. So you aren't trying to distinguish between noise and eavesdropping, but pessimistically assuming that ...


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If there is an evasdroping, an error rate is higher than some long-term average of a quantum communication channel used for a quantum key distribution. So, when the error rate is high, the key is deleted and new one is distribuited again until noise level is at acceptable level. A natural noise can be reduced with classical error correction, something like ...


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As Adam Zalcman has stated in his answer, channels whose Kraus operators are proportional to unitary operators are called mixed-unitary channels (or, alternatively, random unitary channels). Every mixed-unitary channel is unital (meaning that it maps the identity operator to itself), so if you want a channel that is not mixed unitary, just pick any non-...


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I don't know the fully general answer, but have found a solution for channels acting on a single qubit. Mixed-unitary channels Quantum channels that admit a Kraus representation consisting solely of multiples of unitary operators are known as mixed-unitary channels, i.e. $\mathcal{E}$ is a mixed-unitary channel if there exists unitary operators $U_i$ and ...


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