40

Yes, it's possible (but slow). There are a couple of existing (this is only a partial list) emulators: QDD: A Quantum Computer Emulation Library QDD is a C++ library which provides a relatively intuitive set of quantum computing constructs within the context of the C++ programming environment. QDD is unique in that the its emulation of quantum computing ...


26

Yes, it is possible to simulate a quantum computer on a normal one – But you most likely have to sacrifice efficiency. The dimension of the state space rises exponentially with the number of qubits ($2^n$, where $n$ is the number of qubits), so the linear algebra you will be dealing with won't be too light – You'll encounter very large matrices and the ...


23

Yes, it is possible to simulate quantum computations on a classical computer. But the cost of simulations grows exponentially with qubit count and/or circuit depth and/or particular operation counts. For trying ideas quickly, my simulator Quirk is great. It's an open-source drag-and-drop quantum circuit simulator that runs in your web browser. You can ...


16

If you're specifically looking at Q#, then it's super easy to use with an emulator -- in fact, it's not possible to have Q# but not have the emulator, they're bundled together. To get started, first you need to download .NET Core from Microsoft's website. When you download Microsoft's Quantum Development Kit through dotnet new -i "Microsoft.Quantum....


5

A logical qubit is made out of many physical qubits (or qudits), simply selecting a particular two-dimensional subspace. So you can’t make it “exclusively” out of logical qubits because they sit on top of real physical qubits. In fact, if you're thinking about a terminology of "virtual qubits", that is actually best thought of as a synonym for "logical ...


5

It is certainly sufficient to always calculate the full $2^n\times 2^n$ unitary matrix, and then apply it to the $2^n$-entry state vector. If that's what you choose to do, that's all you have to do as all the entanglement information is contained in that vector. A quick and easy way to see if a particular qubit is entangled is to take the partial trace of ...


3

I think a nice "overview" about the subject can be found at: Quantiki They have a list of quantum computer simulators in several languages, some of the simulators have been cited here before. However, they keep a list that they update to inform (or try to inform) of the project's status. There are some "libraries" such as: Haskell qchas (qchas: A library ...


3

Yes. If you build it yourself, find a 3rd party computer with the same specs as the BullSequana M9600 series, or come up with €100K+ and buy a system from Atos. Notice the similarity between the BullSequana M9600 series and the Atos QLM. Same box (and probably internal components) with different software (but you wanted to use your own, Q#). Atos claims: "...


2

Is it possible to emulate a quantum network over a classic network? Yes. The following projects are currently available: SimulaQron SimulaQron is a distributed simulation of the end nodes in a future quantum internet with the specific goal to explore application development. The end nodes in a quantum internet are few qubit processors, which may ...


2

I joined the Quantum internet Hackaton with Simulaqron We did simulations for the quantum leader election algorithms Simulaqron is more an abstract simulator on a classical computer or classical network. Most important aspect is entanglement between 2 nodes. This can be done with only command called EPR and creates an entangled pair of qubits on different ...


2

Short answer: Logical qubits are just an abstraction above physical qubits. A logical qubit is something (see after for examples) that acts like a qubit. Some examples A logical qubit can be: A single physical qubit. This is the case for most of (all?) the quantum chips currently available. In this case, the logical qubit has no advantage over the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible