5

This is a purely hypothetical answer - I don't know if anybody has ever studied it, and have not attempted to find out - but think about public key cryptography. Current public key systems are based on the idea that some problems in the complexity class NP are probably hard to solve directly, but there exists a "proof" that lets you verify the solution ...


1

I think there's some confusion here, so I'll try to explain the principle of QKD (Quantum Key Distribution) instead. Say Alice and Bob want to communicate in a secure fashion using symmetric encryption. To do so, they require a shared secret, a key. One of them generates it and he must somehow get it to the other person without an eavesdropper, say Eve, ...


1

I think that there are many interesting answers to your question, but I would like to point out what I personally find the most mesmerizing consequence of quantum theory to cryptography. One of the most fascinating quantum phenomena that has no classical counterpart is no cloning. This essentially means that if you don't have enough information about some ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible