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How to decompose a multi qubit Clifford unitary into a sequence of clifford gates

There is only one method (the KAK decomposition) that is provably minimal in the number of 2-qubit gates, and it's for 2 qubit unitaries. I've found these 2 papers useful on that topic: paper 1 See ...
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Clifford circuit approximation to a random Clifford circuit

Clifford operations are discrete. They can't approximate arbitrary states. The state may not be close to a state reachable by Clifford operations. There are $O(L^2)$ distinct $L$-qubit states ...
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How are non-clifford gates simulated in Stim and other simulators?

For all methods that are known today, there is no efficient way to implement most general cases of non-Clifford gates, unless you have some restriction. Full state vector simulation as qiskit, is not ...
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Is there a name for a gate that 'moves' one qubit to a new position via multiple SWAP gates?

Note that the first SWAP places qubit $i+1$ at position $i$. The second one places qubit $i+2$ at position $i+1$. Eventually, the qubit number $k$ will be at place $k-1$ for $k>i$, while qubit $i$ ...
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Why apply the inverse operations in Randomized Benchmarking, when we can easily simulate Clifford operations?

For the review, you can have a look at this tutorial by Kliesch and Roth. For the technical points on RB, I think salix's answer captures the basic idea. However, I have some additional remarks, since ...
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Why apply the inverse operations in Randomized Benchmarking, when we can easily simulate Clifford operations?

The aim of RB is to remove the SPAM errors (state preparation and measurement errors) and only characterize the gates errors. This is achieve with measuring the success probability for different ...
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