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Classical computers are inherently deterministic, so they either generate pseudorandom numbers, or use an external physical process with statistically random noise to generate random numbers. Quantum computers are inherently probabilistic, so generating true random numbers is very natural for them. Quantum random number generators are already on the market ...


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Bra-ket notation is not necessarily tied to "quantum math," it's simply a convenient notation in many circumstances. It may seem intimidating at first, but once you understand the basics (ket = vector, bra = covector) it's straightforward to grasp, as long as you have a solid understanding of Linear Algebra. If you are shaky on Linear Algebra, different ...


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At least currently, most of the translations being made are in extraordinarily specialized areas - for example, quantum chemistry / computational chemistry. A lot of the math involves mapping domain math to quantum computers - ab initio molecular simulations need to map their traditional annihilation/creation operators to the X, Y, Z gates in quantum ...


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Quantum computing is not a refinement of classical computing; it's simply a different paradigm of computing aimed at solving specific categories of problems more efficiently. Quantum computing doesn't necessarily require qubits (cf. qudit); that's just a theoretical and experimental convenience. In fact, continuous-variable quantum computing seems to be a ...


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