New answers tagged

1

Quantum computers can be seen as "quantum accelerators" attached to a classical computer. The application of quantum gates is a problem of sending signals to the quantum device/accelerator. The classical aspect of signal sending is clocked by the classical computer. The speed of the quantum machine is determined: relatively: to the worst case complexity ...


2

Quantum computing does not promise computational speed-ups due to faster clock rates. Rather, the speed-ups are algorithmic. This means that, to achieve the same task (for suitable tasks that allow for this speed-up), quantum computers would need a smaller number of operations to produce an answer. These speed-ups exist even if each "single operation" takes ...


2

There's no straightforward equivalent of the concept of clock rate in quantum computing. Quantum computers are supposed to produce algorithmic speedups only for very specific categories of problems. In simple words, quantum algorithms can be represented by quantum circuits which are basically a sequence of quantum gates. To give you an idea of how quantum ...


1

Yes, assume it's classical. That is, unless the protocol requires you to start computing it on superpositions. In that case, you'd have to perform the calculation on a quantum computer, although you can still use the reversible version of the classical algorithm on that quantum computer (because quantum computers can implement any classical computation, you ...


3

Quantum computers can leak information to the environment in order to perform non-unitary transformations. The problem is that this irreversibly entangles the computer's state with the environment, i.e. it is equivalent to measuring the qubits that were leaked. This will collapse the state of the computer and prevent the interference effects that are needed ...


Top 50 recent answers are included