9

I don't think you need to know quantum physics to understand quantum computing - similarly to how you don't think about the hardware implementation of the classical computers when you write high-level code for them. The field of quantum computing has grown to the point where one cannot really teach all of it in one course, so different approaches to ...


8

Short answer: no. Any classical algorithm can be transformed into quantum algorithm. This result has little practical value, because you don't obtain quantum speedup, but it is important from theoretical point of view.


3

I believe it is possible to study Quantum Mechanics by studying Quantum Computing. A qubit is a simplest quantum system showing non-classical behavior (superposition of basis states). It is very logical to start studying Quantum Mechanics from the simplest quantum system, and then move to more complex multiqubit systems. If you need Quantum Mechanics to ...


2

do we need to come up with completely different quantum-based solutions for such problems, or is there a way to 'interpret' existing algorithms to the quantum domain and still expect some speedup? Generally speaking yes, you need to come up with different algorithms. You cannot simply take a classical algorithm and "quantize it" in a straightforward way. ...


1

The reason that a quantum computer is faster in same tasks is given by different computational paradigm based on quantum mechanics laws. They mainly exploit superposition (i.e. state of qubit is linear combination of zero state and one state) and quantum entanglement (i.e. two or more qubits are connected and they behave as one system, or in other words ...


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