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The earliest non-internal reference I can find is in NIPS 2009 from a Google/D-Wave effort1. You'll notice that the two Choi papers, in addition to not using the term "Chimera", do not describe a Chimera graph (and note that the name comes from D-Wave, not from graph theory). For a good early reference on Chimera, I recommend Bunyk et al., 20141 , which ...


5

Pegasus is the first fundamental change in D-Wave's architecture since the D-Wave One. The D-Wave Two, 2X, and 2000Q all used the "Chimera" architecture, which consisted of unit cells of $K_{4,4}$ graphs. The four generations of D-Wave machines just added more qubits by adding more and more unit cells that were the same. In Pegasus, the actual structure of ...


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You are right that $K_{3,3}$ is non-planar, but as you said yourself, a larger $k$ is much better. If they could do $K_{1000,1000}$ that would be nice, because each qubit could be coupled to 1002 qubits (1000 within the $K_{1000,1000}$ and two to the neighboring cells). Instead D-Wave is limited to problems which can be embedded such that each qubit couples ...


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user1271772's answer is entirely correct. I was going to comment with additional information to help answer nippon's question, but I just created this account and apparently there's a reputation requirement before adding comments. D-Wave's superconducting flux qubits are niobium metal loops that form a "hash symbol" made of two flat layers that have been ...


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Hope this late contribution won't be a meaningless contribution, but as mentioned in one of the comments above, by using D-Waves version of NetworkX you can visualize the Pegasus network. I have attached a few images here of the Pegasus 2 (P2) and Pegasus 6 (P6) architectures using the D-Wave NetworkX. The reason that I find Pegasus interesting is that the ...


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How is D-Wave's Pegasus architecture different from the Chimera architecture? See: "Pegasus: The second connectivity graph for large-scale quantum annealing hardware" (Jan 22 2019), by Nike Dattani (Harvard), Szilard Szalay (Wigner Research Centre), and Nick Chancellor (Durham). Figures were made with their open source software PegasusDraw. "The 128 ...


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