7

It appears to be true, up to a point. As I read Scott Aaronson's paper, it says that if you start with 1 photon in each of the first $M$ modes of an interferometer, and find the probability $P_S$ that a set $s_i$ photons is output in each mode $i\in\{1,\ldots, N\}$ where $\sum_is_i=M$, is $$ P_s=\frac{|\text{Per(A)}|^2}{s_1!s_2!\ldots s_M!}. $$ So, indeed, ...


7

About the need of boson sampling verification First of all, let me point out that it is not a strict necessity to verify the output of a boson sampler. By this, I don't mean to say that it is not useful or interesting to try and do so, but rather that it is in some sense more of a practical than a fundamental necessity. I think you yourself put up a good ...


6

You cannot efficiently recover the absolute values of the amplitudes, but if you allow for arbitrary many samples, then you can estimate them to whatever degree of accuracy you like. More specifically, if the input state is a single photon in each of the first $n$ modes, and one is willing to draw an arbitrary number of samples from the output, then it is ...


5

There are a couple variants of the HOG test. "Old HOG" computed the proportion of unique samples whose probability is larger than the median probability of the distribution. It then compares that proportion to a threshold, e.g. 2/3. If you have enough larger-than-median outputs, you pass the test. "New HOG" instead computes the mean of the probabilities of ...


3

Just a small complement to @gIS excellent answer: I know of several people (including myself) interested on the public verification aspect. As far as I know, all attempts have failed, hence the lack of literature on the subject: as soon as one can prove the Boson sampler acted correctly, it is indeed a regime where the Boson sampler can be efficiently ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible