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Much of the research on quantum algorithms that may have applications to AI is centered on quantum machine learning (QML). While I'd argue there are quite a few hypothetical reasons that QML could be used in machine learning some time in the future, QML research is in its infancy relative to classical machine learning research and its practical benefits ...


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There is good reason to believe that quantum computers will eventually play an important role in drug discovery. Perhaps the best way to show that it's not science fiction is to talk about the startups forming that are focused on QC-enabled drug discovery. The companies that I know of that fit this description are ProteinQure HQS GTN Qulab Riverlane


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On the practical side: A lot of work is currently going into getting small scale quantum computers to work, and this involves fundamental understanding and manipulation of small quantum systems, be it ions, photons or whatever else. I can only imagine what other uses we would be able to find for having a better grasp on handling these fundamental systems. A ...


3

As an initial matter, let's ask "what is the classical computational complexity of solving 'mate-in-$n$' type games?" For example, is it even in $\mathcal{NP}$ to know, given a certain chess position, that white can mate in $10$ or fewer moves? It's been known for a while that we can consider such questions as a "quantified boolean formula" (QBF) question. ...


3

Thinking about the theoretical capabilities of quantum computers has led to important insights on the theory of classical computers. One example is the proof that the (classical) complexity class PP is closed under intersection. While there was already a purely classical proof due to Beigel, Reingold, and Spielman, there exists a simpler proof that uses ...


2

Speculatively expanding on previous answer Quantum computers tend to outperform classical computers in determining global properties of functions. Further, the properties tend to be some measure of global symmetry. Based on the global symmetry, the probability amplitudes can constructively (and destructively) interfere, in ways that a classical computer ...


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Executing a NISQ-device in a manner that asymptotically outperforms a classical computer invalidates the Extended Church-Turing Thesis (ECT). Voluminous tomes written about the (non-extended) Church-Turing Thesis, with implications for branches of philosophy such as the philosophy of mind. The fact that the ECT was not only falsifiable but also is likely ...


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You can participate in and contribute to open-source Qiskit. You can write tools to work with Qiskit and/or other development kits, e.g., my qis_job which makes it easy to run a .qasm file right away. You can write your own toys! See my quantum_yiqing.


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In this survey article they discuss Grover's algorithm. In my opinion, the most important part: Grover’s speed-up from $N$ to $\sqrt{N}$ is not as devastating as Shor’s speed-up. Furthermore, each of Grover’s $\sqrt{N}$ quantum evaluations must wait for the previous evaluation to finish. To quantify this issue, define T as the number of serial ...


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At this early stage of quantum technology development, a useful starting point to understand the "expectation of profitability" is to look at the private markets (angel investing, venture capital, private equity, etc) in addition to public companies. Today there are 76 companies active in quantum computing, those were involved in 178 deals where 260 ...


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