2

D-Wave works more like a quantum simulator. It has a grid of two-level quantum system 'qubits'. However any single qubit cannot be arbitrarily rotated like in a universal QC. All qubits form a collective state that is the ground state of some Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian is parametrized by a set of coefficients. Initially the coefficients are set so that ...


1

You may find some base information how D-Wave qubit is implemented in this article Introduction of D-Wave hardware D-Wave is not universal quantum computer and for this reason does not satisfy DiVincenzo's criteria. Related question, answer


1

All three of the bulleted or numbered claims in your OP are correct. But the flaw in your logic in combining them together is that D-Wave is not a "universal" quantum annealer, in the sense that it can't operate perfectly at all "temperatures"/levels of adiabaticity. In other words, it can (allegedly) perform some types of quantum ...


1

I asked a similar question on the Operations Research Stack Exchange. This answer lists about 20 different problems that can be solved by QUBO. If you want a "dead-simple" example that has some meaning, I personally think that the algorithm for factoring integers using QUBO, is the simplest one to understand, but that is only my opinion.


1

I would recommend the following resources. Quantum annealing is about QUBO/Ising formulations. First thing would be to get familiar with the formulations, and see examples of how do you formulate a few problems: A Tutorial on Formulating and Using QUBO Models Ising formulations of many NP problems Then, if you have a specific problem you would like to ...


1

There is no guarantee the lowest energy solution get picked more often, or even get picked once. Many parameters may be tweaked in order to improve your results. I am not sure if you are running time parameters by default but you may tweak more the times (like longer annealing time...). Secondly, it may be the case that this problem corresponds to a hard ...


1

From what I understand, $x_{i,t}$ are the binary variables. So your QUBO matrix should not be indexed as Q[i][t]. If you do this way, this means you have a binary variable $x_i$ and a binary variable $x_t$ and they have a real coefficient, so representing a term $Q[i][j] *x_i x_j$. In this case, if you really want a QUBO matrix with a correct indexing, you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible