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In Bell test experiments, the term quantum correlation has come to mean the expectation value of the product of the outcomes on the two sides. In other words, the expected change in physical characteristics as one quantum system passes through an interaction site.

3
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of a particular $ab$ is the product of these independent probabilities. In Bell's equalities, we see that this is not the case. Correlations between $a$ and $b$ depend explicitly on which pair of …
answered Nov 14 '18 by James Wootton
2
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represent all the ways that we can choose to have correlations or anticorrelations between the $|0\rangle / |1\rangle$ states of the computational basis and the $|+\rangle / |-\rangle$ states of the $X …
answered Apr 11 '18 by James Wootton
6
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Basically, it means that the correlations could be used to send a message. Or simply that Bob’s measurement outcomes can reveal some details of Alice’s actions. This is impossible when Alice and Bob … Bob. Note that non-signaling correlations usually mean that some source correlated a couple of qubits, and then sent one to Alice and the other to Bob. There is then no causal link between what Alice …
answered Mar 30 '18 by James Wootton