Questions tagged [google-sycamore]

A 54-qubit superconducting quantum processor by Google Quantum AI which is claimed to have been used to demonstrate quantum computational supremacy.

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Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 3): sampling

In Google's 54 qubit Sycamore processor, they created a 53 qubit quantum circuit using a random selection of gates from the set $\{\sqrt{X}, \sqrt{Y}, \sqrt{W}\}$ in the following pattern: ...
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Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 1): choice of gate set

I was recently going through the paper titled "Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor" by NASA Ames Research Centre and the Google Quantum AI team (note that the paper was ...
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Do quantum supremacy experiments repeatedly apply the same random unitary?

It is my understanding that, given a quantum computer with $n$ qubits and a way to apply $m$ single- and 2-qubit gates, quantum supremacy experiments Initialize the $n$ qubits into the all-zero's ket ...
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What does Google's claim of “Quantum Supremacy” mean for the question of BQP vs BPP vs NP?

Google recently announced that they have achieved "Quantum Supremacy": "that would be practically impossible for a classical machine." Does this mean that they have definitely proved that BQP ≠ BPP ?...
6
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1answer
499 views

Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 2): simplifiable and intractable tilings

In Google's 54 qubit Sycamore processor, they created a 53 qubit quantum circuit using a random selection of gates from the set $\{\sqrt{X}, \sqrt{Y}, \sqrt{W}\}$ in the following pattern: ...
3
votes
2answers
150 views

How exactly is solving the random circuit sampling problem a computation in the Church-Turing thesis sense?

Note: This has been cross-posted to CS Theory SE. If we assume $\mathsf{BQP} \neq \mathsf{BPP}$, then we can say with reasonable certainty that Google's random sampling experiment falsifies the ...