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Questions tagged [google-sycamore]

A 54-qubit superconducting quantum processor by Google Quantum AI which is claimed to have been used to demonstrate quantum computational supremacy.

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72 views

Are 20 repetitions of Sycamore's one- and 2-qubit gates sufficient to produce a uniformly random state?

In the answer to this question about random circuits, James Wootton states: One way to see how well we [fully explore the Hilbert space] is to focus on just randomly producing $n$ qubit states. ...
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1answer
138 views

Quantum Supremacy: Some questions on cross-entropy benchmarking

I was skimming through the Google quantum supremacy paper but got stuck on this section: For a given circuit, we collect the measured bit-strings $\{x_i\}$ and compute the linear XEB fidelity [24-...
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1answer
78 views

Number of qubits to achieve quantum supremacy?

Google's Sycamore paper describes achieving quantum supremacy on a $53$-qubit quantum computer. The layout of Sycamore is $n=6\times 9=54$ nearest neighbors, with one qubit nonfunctional. They apply ...
4
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1answer
71 views

Location of “bad” qubits on Sycamore

The Sycamore paper from Google notes that Sycamore is a $54$-qubit quantum processor, but for their experiments only $53$ qubits were working. The "bad" qubit was on the edge of the array. Is ...
2
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1answer
156 views

Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 3): sampling

In Google's 54 qubit Sycamore processor, they created a 53 qubit quantum circuit using a random selection of gates from the set $\{\sqrt{X}, \sqrt{Y}, \sqrt{W}\}$ in the following pattern: ...
4
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1answer
193 views

Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 2): simplifiable and intractable tilings

In Google's 54 qubit Sycamore processor, they created a 53 qubit quantum circuit using a random selection of gates from the set $\{\sqrt{X}, \sqrt{Y}, \sqrt{W}\}$ in the following pattern: ...
7
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2answers
225 views

Understanding Google's “Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor” (Part 1): choice of gate set

I was recently going through the paper titled "Quantum supremacy using a programmable superconducting processor" by NASA Ames Research Centre and the Google Quantum AI team (note that the paper was ...
3
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2answers
151 views

Do quantum supremacy experiments repeatedly apply the same random unitary?

It is my understanding that, given a quantum computer with $n$ qubits and a way to apply $m$ single- and 2-qubit gates, quantum supremacy experiments Initialize the $n$ qubits into the all-zero's ket ...