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I'm prepared to explore quantum computing which is completely new to me. Searching for a while on the Internet, I found IBM Qiskit which is an Open Source software necessitated for Quantum Computing. Also, I found the following documentation;

1) Hello Quantum: Taking your first steps into quantum computation

2) Installing Qiskit

3) Coding with Qiskit

4) Qiskit 0.12

5) Qiskit API documentation

6) Qiskit IQX Tutorials

Before starting I expect to know whether I need a quantum computer for my exploration? Or a classic computer, a desktop PC, can do the job?

Please shed me some light? Thanks in advance.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by glS, Mark S, Mithrandir24601 Oct 8 at 14:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ what's the question? $\endgroup$ – glS Oct 3 at 14:14
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Quantum Computing SE! Is your question essentially asking whether or not you need a quantum computer of some sort in order to ruin Qiskit, or if a standard PC is all you need? Or are you talking about more general/different 'exploration'? $\endgroup$ – Mithrandir24601 Oct 5 at 22:35
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IBM's Qiskit consists of multiple components. Qiskit terra provides you the tools for building quantum circuits. You can either run these circuits on an actual quantum device on IBMQ Experience which is a free cloud-based Quantum computer service.

Or you can run your circuit on Qiskit Aer; another Qiskit component. This component simulates the circuit on your classical device to obtain results. plus it provides you with the tools to visualize the quantum state in multiple ways (Bloch sphere, unitary, state vector...).

At the end of the day, your computation is limited by either the number of the qubits available on the different IBMQ devices or your computer's ability to simulate a quantum circuit. Either way, for learning and exploration this should be enough.

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