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I started this book on quantum computing (Nielsen and Chuang). I have gone through the first chapter but I need to really understand the concepts; what should I do? Should I cover some background topics or move to some other book. By the way, I have done Bachelors in Computer Science; I never studied quantum before but I started this book so I can start research on quantum algorithms.

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marked as duplicate by Sanchayan Dutta, Nelimee, Community Jun 20 at 8:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Apart from the resources mentioned in the Linked threads, I recently came across a textbook that's very much like an "undergraduate version" of Nielsen and Chuang, and should be helpful for you to get started.

Elements of Quantum Computation and Quantum Communication - Anirban Pathak

Preface:

This introductory textbook is written primarily for undergraduate students of physics, mathematics, computer science and other related disciplines. It is also expected to be valuable to teachers as well as to researchers working in other domains, who are interested in obtaining an understanding of quantum computation and quantum communication. I used to offer a course on quantum information theory from 2002-2006. Later I offered a few short courses in different summer schools and workshops. This book is prepared mainly from those lectures. There are many excellent textbooks on quantum information theory. However, most of those books are either too technical for beginners or they are not complete. This was one of my reasons for writing this book. But more importantly, every teacher has his/her own way to present the subject and teachers are usually biased on that. I belong to that class of biased teachers and this book is an initiative to present the subject in my way. Another fact that played a very important role in the present initiative is that there are engineering students who hardly know anything about quantum mechanics and there are physics students who do not know what a Turing machine is. But students from both groups are equally interested in quantum computing and often they join the same course. Keeping both kinds of students in mind, this book aims to give a brief idea of quantum computation and quantum communication in a self-contained manner. It does not demand any prior knowledge of quantum mechanics or computer science.(...)

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