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It is known that there are big companies behind the specific qubit implementations (e.g. ion traps, superconducting loops, topological qubits, etc.). But I have not managed to find the company that is backing/implementing diamond vacancy quantum computers. Currently, it seems to me that this technology is confined only to the laboratories of universities. I am speaking about Nitrogen-vacancy center.

So - is there any company that backs and implements diamond vacancy quantum computers?

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    $\begingroup$ All of the answers that were not accepted are better than the accepted one. $\endgroup$ Aug 13, 2022 at 11:40

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It's unlikely. And even if there is, they've not announced it publicly. Most of the private companies and startups in this area are still in the stealth mode. This is the most complete list of quantum computing startups that I know of. Among the companies listed, Atom Computing may be working on diamond-based quantum computers, but they haven't released much information yet.

All I could find about them is: "Utilizing techniques pioneered by quantum gas and precision measurement experiments, Atom Computing will create machines using optically trapped neutral atoms capable of reaching the large qubit numbers needed for error-corrected quantum computing." For what it's worth, one of their co-founders Jonathan King specializes in this area and was a co-author on Multi-spin-assisted optical pumping of bulk 13C nuclear spin polarization in diamond (Pagliero et al., 2018).

You may also be interested in the article Toward mass-producible quantum computers published by MIT news, which discusses the current progress in NV-center based quantum computing. Now why diamond-based quantum computing isn't so mainstream is a good question, but you should probably ask that in a new thread.

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  • $\begingroup$ Atom computing is doing exactly what you described, quantum computing with neutral atoms in a gas - similar to ion computing but with neutral atoms. They are not doing any solid state NV or diamond work at all. $\endgroup$ Nov 7, 2022 at 4:05
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I work in patents, rather than Quantum computing itself, but was looking a bit at this area. Patenting, so far, shows Element Six (a deBeers company ultimately owned by Anglo American) seem to have by far the most patents relating to diamond in quantum computing applications. I, also, found mention of a company called Quantum Brilliance, but there is not evidence of them in patents yet. But, note, there is a significant lag in such things becoming visible via patenting.

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WAINVAM-E is one the latest companies working on Nitrogen Vacancy sensors for industrial use.

You should check their website : https://wainvam-e.com/

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Element six are working on full scale, error corrected quantum computers in NV centers. Check out for example this: https://scholar.google.com/citations?view_op=view_citation&hl=en&user=qmqMfUkAAAAJ&sortby=pubdate&citation_for_view=qmqMfUkAAAAJ:g8uWPOAv7ggC

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