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Time-bin encoding is a technique used in Quantum information science to encode a qubit of information on a photon. Wikipedia

Is there a generalization for $n$-th level qudits?

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  • $\begingroup$ This question seems to broad. Are there specific parts of the Wikipedia entry which you don't understand/you have questions about? Also, why do you link to an article which does not use time-bin encoding to encode a 10-level system? $\endgroup$ – Norbert Schuch Dec 9 '18 at 13:28
  • $\begingroup$ @NorbertSchuch I have narrowed the question. Also, the linked article was meant as an example of a (frequency-bin?) photonic qudit. $\endgroup$ – meowzz Dec 9 '18 at 16:05
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    $\begingroup$ this is a bit confusing. "Time-bin encoding" means to use the time as degree of freedom on which to store the (quantum) information. As such, this sort of encoding can in principle encode arbitrary high-dimensional qudits. The limitation is obviously in the actual experimental constraints. $\endgroup$ – glS Dec 9 '18 at 19:16
  • $\begingroup$ @glS Do you have any references regarding encoding arbitrary high-dimensional qudits? $\endgroup$ – meowzz Dec 9 '18 at 19:28
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Yes! The first application of time bin photonic qudits that comes to mind is for quantum key distribution. Here's an example: https://arxiv.org/abs/1611.01139. I am sure there are more references out there though!

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  • $\begingroup$ Awesome! Have you seen this other question of mine? $\endgroup$ – meowzz Dec 10 '18 at 23:53
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There is a number of groups using time-bin encoding to realise computation/communication protocols.

One example is Furusawa's group in Japan, which among other things works on measurement-based QC with time-bin encoding (e.g. 1706.06312). Another example that comes to mind is Silberhorn's group in Paderborn. They use time-bin encoding for various things, a random example of which is 1710.06103.

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