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Are there schematics and/or diagrams out there to build a very basic quantum system?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by glS, MEE the setup wizard, Nelimee, Sanchayan Dutta, Rob Jul 27 '18 at 18:41

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ For the record, this asks two different questions, one in the title and one in the body, and both are rather broad and localized. You may wish to edit the question. $\endgroup$ – heather Jul 23 '18 at 21:56
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    $\begingroup$ @rrtucci added a comment: "You could buy one from Google" and I asked if you could purchase a Bristlecone and it was removed. Why was this removed from the post? $\endgroup$ – jfleach Jul 25 '18 at 0:46
  • $\begingroup$ comments are by their nature epheremal. If a comment doesn't ask for clarification or enhance the understanding of the question, it is open to deletion. Among other things, comments are not places for asking new, unrelated questions. $\endgroup$ – heather Jul 25 '18 at 5:28
  • $\begingroup$ @rrtucci's comment was a jesting way of pointing out that this question is meaningless without some constraint. After all what if someone had enough money to buy out such a large company. $\endgroup$ – AHusain Jul 27 '18 at 2:48
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I think this kind of depends on what you are looking for. You asked about building a basic quantum system which you can totally do*. Just grab a good laser, single photon detectors, beam splitters and wave plates, and some attenuating filters. If you can get the laser down to a trickle of single photons you can do some fun quantum key distribution demos, and operations on single qubits (possibly on pairs if you have the right components). Now, that's obviously no computer, but since computers are built out of qubits its a start. Also as @peterh mentioned, there is lots of simulators that you can use if you want to work with more qubits now, and example being Q# that actually can estimate the number of qubits you would need to run your algorithm on a real quantum computer.

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The only commercially available quantum machines are from a company called D-Wave however there is debate on exactly how "quantum" their machines are.

True quantum computers in the way most of the community looks at them are not available for physical purchase, although IBM's Q Experience allows you to use their quantum computing resources through the cloud.

In terms of trying to DIY a quantum computer we are a long way from such a goal being viable.

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Considering that they are currently experiments in different labs, with the record of around 72 qubit, they are yet very far from a product which can be sold.

However, you can choose from a long list of different emulators/simulators.

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