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I'm quite new to quantum computing (1 week) but I noticed that implementing the circuits of someone else is quite simple, while having a deep grasp on it is way harder. Moreover I definetly don't feel ready to design quantum algorithms, despite I mastered many classical ones.

How much did you take to design your first quantum algorithms. Am I dumb or this is something that newbies experience frequently?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi and welcome to Quantum Computing SE. By design an algorithm, you mean to invent a new one? If so, that is really not easy and necessitate deep understanding of quantum computing! $\endgroup$ Jan 6 at 18:11

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The field and the pedagogy associated with quantum computing has matured so much over the last 5-10 years that what once might have taken a couple of semesters of graduate school can maybe be taught in a single semester of advanced undergraduate school, with maybe some other topics accessible at (US) high-school. But be realistic - I'd love to be proven wrong but if you've only had one week of studying quantum computing then I'd find it highly unlikely that you'll be designing the next version of Shor's algorithm or Grover's algorithm anytime soon.

That said, there are plenty of side-projects or other algorithms that you could consider attacking - that might require some flexing of "thinking quantumly". For example, in increasing order of complexity, you could:

  • Design a quantum algorithm to simulate coin-tossing;
  • And then of tossing a six-sided die;
  • Design an algorithm to simulate scrambling up a 15-puzzle;
  • Design a quantum algorithm to calculate the determinant of an $n\times n$ matrix of entries selected from $\{0,1\}$.

Apart from the very first one, these are probably going to be really tough for someone who has only been studying for one week, or even for a full semester!

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  • $\begingroup$ thanks a lot :-) $\endgroup$
    – Beppe
    Jan 7 at 13:39

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