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I am trying to understand the landscape of one- and two-qubit gate times for various quantum computing architectures. It is not so hard to find gate times for various gates such as Hadamard, CNOT and SWAP (for example) for superconducting qubits, ion traps or neutral atoms.

However, when it comes to photonic quantum computers (think Xanadu or PsiQuantum) I cannot find much information. I know that photonics might be quite different. Nevertheless, simple gates such as Hadamard or CNOT can be implemented, e.g., Nature Communications volume 2, Article number: 566 (2011).

Still, I might not be aware in what ways the usual gates implemented in hardware agnostic libraries (e.g. Qiskit) differ for photonic quantum architectures.

Questions: Essentially I am asking for references.

  1. What are the best up-to-date gate times for H, CNOT, SWAP, as well as preparing $|0\rangle$ and $|+\rangle$ states in photonic architectures?
  2. Are the usual gate sets that we can apply in, say, superconducting architectures, the same ones for photonics? If not, what are the fundamental differences.

For both, any up-to-date references would be welcome.

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I cannot talk for PsiQuantum, but at Xanadu the gates are based on the continuous variable model. Instead of qubits you will have qumodes, and the gates you use will be entirely different. I recommend that you read this explanation, where you may get an idea on how they compare and differ. Aside from this explanation there are a ton of other tutorials and explanations in the StrawberryFields website.

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  • $\begingroup$ Surely, however, when one tried to implement standard algorithms then one has to use "standard" gate sets and its up to the transpiler to convert this to what the machine actually sees. Therefore, gate times should still be relevant even for photonics (taking into account transpilation times). $\endgroup$
    – Marion
    May 5 at 14:51

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