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I want to build a quantum application, qApp if you will; how does one go about figuring out the right use-case and best framework to turn to, to start building these things?

Quantum REPL? How do I learn how to program qBits? Polarity? Spin? Quantum entanglement? How do you even program that? What are we even talking about; do I even own a dead cat or not?

Unlocking Satoshi Nakamoto's BTC PrivateKey seems like a great place to start no?? Did he even exist to begin with? Anyone have any clues?

Quantum Backend anyone? Maybe like a QuantumNode.js of sorts?

Bueller? Bueller? Anyone?

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi lopezdp. Welcome to the site. Unfortunately, as it stands, this question is very broad, and therefore off-topic here. The site is tailored towards each post containing a single, laser-focused question. Different questions should be asked in separate posts. I would also note that this is not a forum: discussion-prone/opinion-based questions are generally not encouraged. $\endgroup$
    – glS
    Jul 23 at 10:01
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    $\begingroup$ downvoting === freedom. got great answers! I take it as a badge of honor to be hated by the quantum nerds. $\endgroup$
    – lopezdp
    Jul 23 at 18:54
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qApps as you have described them in your question don't exist yet. The number of qubits available through classical simulation or real quantum hardware is not enough and the noise present is too high to run applications that would require a framework like QuantumNode.js or similar.

Right now, we are going through the NISQ era. Which stands for Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum. This basically means that the noise in qubits limits the depth (number of gates) of the circuits we can run on them. This doesn't mean that these qubits are useless, some applications of NISQ computers are: small molecule simulations with VQE, prime factorization (Shor's algorithm), and unstructured data search with Grover's algorithm. I recommend the paper Quantum Computing in the NISQ era and beyond if you want to learn more about this.

To program algorithms like the ones I've described, one of the most popular tools is Qiskit. This is a Python library in which you can build circuits and simulate them in your device or send them to one of IBM's real quantum comptuers. Other tools also exist, like Q# and Cirq.

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  • $\begingroup$ what a great answer. thanks bud! $\endgroup$
    – lopezdp
    Jul 23 at 18:53
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I would suggest to learn quantum programming with IBM Quantum Computing Program. A good step by step guideline and tutorials. You will be able to program different scenarios with circuits by it's quantum computer.

Another good point to get as a beginner to advanced information is to stick with Quantum-Inspires Knowledge Base.

Try to understand these principles first and your way will be guided by itself.

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