2
$\begingroup$

I am just wondering if I am interested in quantum computing, but not able to get into engineering. Will I be able to acquire knowledge of quantum computing by for example taking courses in physics and mathematics department?

If so, in particular what physics courses or mathematics courses must I take in order to be capable of understanding the application and theory behind quantum computing?

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

It really depends on what you want to get into. Quantum computing could be approached from a linear algebra/CS side or a physics side. I can only speak for the former and it’s really interesting. To get started I strongly suggest to have a good knowledge of linear algebra. The applications are many, and mainly relate to the fact that the representation of states allows for a speed up of algorithms. In the course I am taking, we are using a book by Mermin called “Quantum Computer Science”, you could look into that to have an idea. For the physics side of the topic, I suggest to ask someone who can give a better overview.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I would say that even in case of classical computing, it is very helpful to understand both mathematical theory, e.g. Turing machines, complexity, Boolean functions etc. and egineering behind, e.g. construction of logical circuits. You do not need to deep dive very much, but basic understanding I consider necessary.

The same is true for quatum computing. To start with mathematical theory behind and basics of quantum physics could be the best way. Then I would investigate programming techniques, firstly assembly languages (e.g. QASM) and then switch to something higher level like Qiskit. Once you know basics, you can easily use already rich libraries for solving practical problems on quantum computers.

You mentioned that you have mathematical and physical background, so understanding basics should be easy for you. I would recommend classical book Quantum computing and Quantum Information by Nielsen and Chuang to start with. It covers both mathematical and physical side of the quantum computing.

After that, try to learn some high level quantum programming language. For example Qiskit is very well documented. You can create for educational purposes free account at IBM Q platform and study yourself with examples provided here. It is necessary to know Python language but I think you can find many online courses about that language.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.