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I am a Physics student that just entered the field of quantum computing. I am obviously lacking in the electronic engineering side of things and would love to learn more! Any advice for good books?

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    $\begingroup$ It seems like you are interested in knowing more about the quantum engineer side of thing rather than algorithm. If that is the case then this might be good: "A Quantum Engineer's Guide to Superconducting Qubits". arxiv.org/abs/1904.06560 It is not a textbook but a pretty nice overall review. $\endgroup$
    – KAJ226
    Feb 3 at 15:01
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you! It looks right up my alley! $\endgroup$
    – bbbb
    Feb 4 at 11:14
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I suppose electrical engineering plays two roles in quantum computing. The first role is that generally all quantum hardware needs a stack of various classical components for the control and readout of qubits, like any physics experiment. But I imagine you are more interested in something like superconducting qubits, where electrical circuits themselves form the qubits in use. If this is the case, as far as textbooks go, I can suggest "Quantum Engineering: Theory and Design of Quantum Coherent Structures" by A.M. Zagoskin, which provides ample details on Josephson junctions, circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED), and quantum noise, though it's a bit of a deep dive if you are new to this stuff. There are a lot of review papers on these topics as well, that are arguably a better way to learn the subject.

As @KAJ226 commented, "A Quantum Engineer's Guide to Superconducting Qubits" is a great place to start, and it covers a bit of everything in good detail.

The same group from MIT has a couple other very nice review articles, such as "Superconducting Qubits: Current State of Play", which focuses on recent research and results in the field (various gates, qubit designs, algorithm demonstration, etc.) and "3D integration and packaging for solid-state qubits" which goes into everything that sits between the qubits and the data traces on our computers.

If you want to know more about quantizing circuits and how to actually get qubits out of inductors, Josephson junctions, capacitors, etc., then check out "Introduction to Quantum Electromagnetic Circuits", which is one of the original reviews on cQED.

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