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I'm very new to quantum computing, sorry if this is a dumb question.

I was reading in some lecture notes I found online that a quantum network could be created by using teleportation multiple times to move a qubit from one node to the next until it reaches its destination. So, like if you wanted to get a qubit from point A to point D, you could send it from A to B, B to C, and then C to D. At each step, you would send 2 classical bits and use them for quantum teleportation of a qubit.

2 bits  A -> B
1 qubit A -> B
2 bits  B -> C
1 qubit B -> C
2 bits  C -> D
1 qubit C -> D

So I guess my question is, would it be possible to send the necessary classical bits from A to B to C to D, and then use those to directly perform quantum teleportation from A to D? And if so, what is the advantage of performing quantum teleportation at each step?

2 bits  A -> B
2 bits  B -> C
2 bits  C -> D
1 qubit A -> D
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Indeed a better strategy is to create an entangled state between A and D, then use teleportation to transfer any quantum state from A to D. Creating such a long range entanglement may require an entanglement swapping protocol, involving intermediate nodes.

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I guess that there is no direct connection between A and D and this is a reason why qubit is firstly sent to B, then to C and finnaly to D. Of, course you can use classical bits generated at A to teleport a state to D but you need to have entangled qubits between A and D.

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