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Do the latest D-Wave machines use compounds of $\require{\mhchem}\ce{^{3}He}$ and $\ce{^{4}He}$ for cooling? If not, how does D-Wave approach cooling its plates low enough to achieve Super Conductivity? What compounds does DWave use for the plates in their fridge, and at what temperature do its plates reach super conductivity?

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    $\begingroup$ Please format chemical formulae: quantumcomputing.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/136/… $\endgroup$ – Sanchayan Dutta Mar 30 '18 at 14:13
  • $\begingroup$ Fixed, took me a second to get that formatting. $\endgroup$ – Dylan Dodds Mar 30 '18 at 14:26
  • $\begingroup$ @DylanDodds Yes, all LaTeX commands must be placed in math mode. A bit counter-intuitive. $\endgroup$ – Discrete lizard Mar 30 '18 at 14:27
  • $\begingroup$ @Blue Any good reason to remove the tags superconductivity and temperature? They seem fine by me. $\endgroup$ – Discrete lizard Mar 30 '18 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Discretelizard Added the superconducting QC tag. I doubt how many people would sort questions based on "temperature". Doesn't look useful to me. $\endgroup$ – Sanchayan Dutta Mar 30 '18 at 14:31
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Yes, they use $\require{\mhchem}\ce{^3He}$ and $\ce{^4He}$. No, they do not use compounds of these but instead a solution of these two (at the operating temperature) liquid nobel gases. The details can be found in the wikipedia article on dilution refrigerators.

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