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I use dotnet run command to run my .qs quantum circuit. Is there a way to run my circuit N times, and get results of each run (like the shots parameter in Qiskit) ?

Thank you.

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  • $\begingroup$ You could create a python or C# host program to further process data. However, there must be a dotnet command. $\endgroup$ – Jonathcraft Sep 7 at 10:57
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Quantum programs in Q# can include classical logic as well as low-level quantum instructions, such that you can directly include the "shot" concept from circuits in your Q# programs by using a for-loop.

@EntryPoint()
operation RunSeveralTimes(nTimes : Int) : Result[] {
    mutable results = new Result[nTimes];
    for (idx in 0..nTimes - 1) {
        set results w/= idx <- DoSomething();
    }
    return results;
}

When running this program with dotnet run, you can now pass --n-times as a command-line argument to control how many times your DoSomething() operation gets called. Similarly, if you're using Q# in Jupyter Notebooks, you can use a command like %simulate RunSeveralTimes nTimes=50. From Python interoperability, you can pass nTimes as a keyword argument, e.g.: RunSeveralTimes.simulate(nTimes=50).

The Q# standard libraries also offer several functions and operations to make this sort of loop easier to write:

  • EstimateFrequency and EstimateFrequencyA: run an operation many times, and collect the probability with which a measurement at the end returns One.
  • DrawMany: run an operation many times with the same input, and collect all outputs.
  • ForEach: run an operation once for each of many inputs, and collect all outputs.
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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Exactly what I wanted, thank you very much ! $\endgroup$ – user12910 Sep 18 at 19:28
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As mentioned by Jonathcraft, it's possible to modify the host program. For example, set the driver of the Q# program to be C#, then call the Q# program multiple times with a for loop.

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