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I'm wondering if anyone has information regarding the current status of Microsoft quantum hardware? How many working qubits do they have? What are the gate depth/fidelity? Any details about realization? (besides "we're focused on sustainable solutions that will change the world"; "in the future, topological qubits will allow us to reach fault-tolerance", etc.)

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I'm glad that you inserted this quote:

"in the future, topological qubits will allow us to reach fault-tolerance"

So you are at least aware that Microsoft is invested in topoligical quantum computing. You can even see it directly from microsoft.com:

enter image description here

So now the answer to your question:

Topolgical quantum computing is quantum computing that would use anyons. If you read this question of mine you will see that confirming the existence of anyons is still an open problem (unfortunately there is an "answer" to the question, but it is about simulating anyons, not actually realizing them in real life). My answer here explains what anyons are in more detail, and my answer here explains that since using anyons is part of the definition of topological quantum computing, there is no way for Microsoft to make a topological quantum computer by skipping the step of confirming the existence of anyons.

So you ask:

"I'm wondering if anyone has information regarding the current status of Microsoft quantum hardware?" How many working qubits do they have? What are the gate depth/fidelity?

This is what they have so far:

  • # of qubits = 0
  • gate depth = 0
  • fidelity = 0

We need to wait until anyons are confirmed to actually exist, before we can create a quantum computer out of them. While it is possible that Microsoft is working on some other type of quantum computing without telling us, all we know for sure is that their website says "Our approach focuses on topological quantum computing" which means that they do not have any physical device yet. They have made plenty of achievements in quantum computing theory though, as well as software such as liquid. No hardware though.

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